Constitution & Government

Constitutional law and the government of Uganda:

Uganda is a Sovereign State and a Republic. It is a sitting member of the United Nations, African Union, The East African Community and the Commonwealth. The Government of the Republic of Uganda is a Democracy made up of three arms: The Executive – comprising of president, vice president, prime minister, cabinet; The Legislative - parliament; and The Judiciary - Magistrates' Courts, High Court, Court of Appeals (Constitutional Court), Supreme Court.

The Constitution is the supreme law of Uganda. The present constitution was adopted on 8 October 1995. It is Uganda's fourth constitution since the country's independence from Britain in 1962.

The first Constitution was adopted in 1962 only to be replaced 4 years later in 1966. The 1966 Constitution, passed in a tense political environment and without debate, was replaced in 1967. The 1995 Constitution established Uganda as a republic with an executive, legislative, and judicial branch. The roles and powers of each of the Government arms are enshrined and spelt out in the Uganda Constitution 1995.

The Constitution is the supreme law of Uganda. The present constitution was adopted on 8 October 1995. It is Uganda's fourth constitution since the country's independence from Britain in 1962.

The first Constitution was adopted in 1962 only to be replaced 4 years later in 1966. The 1966 Constitution, passed in a tense political environment and without debate, was replaced in 1967. The 1995 Constitution established Uganda as a republic with an executive, legislative, and judicial branch. The roles and powers of each of the Government arms are enshrined and spelt out in the Uganda Constitution 1995. In 2005, the 1995 Constitution was amended to provide for a multi-party political system.